Get to know your personality

This post will lead you through a joyful journey of discovering your personality. 

For every leader, to discover his or her personality can be a great challenge. Revealing your personality can be a fun way to learn about yourself, but it can also make you a more effective team member and leader. 

WHY IS PERSONALITY IMPORTANT FOR A LEADER?

Personality drives our tendency to behave, to feel and to think on a certain way. It’s difficult to change a personality – it is a set of traits that are relatively consistent over time and situations. Most people don’t realize that much of our personality is genetic. In other words, personality is not a choice. You can’t just decide to be more extroverted one day. However, we can grow and adapt as we become aware of the strengths and weaknesses within our personality.

WHICH 5 WORDS WOULD YOU USE TO DESCRIBE YOURSELF?

Over time, nearly every language has developed words to describe personality traits. In the 1980s, the psychologists Paul Costa and Robert McCrae managed to prove that every person –regardless of culture, gender, age or nationality is made up of 5 personality dimensions, so called Big Five. Those dimensions are: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extroversion, Agreeableness and Neuroticism. Fondly known as the Big 5 or the OCEAN, these are incredibly helpful for understanding yourself. When you understand your own personality, you can ask for your needs, connect more easily and optimize your behavior. 

THE – OCEAN –  BIG 5 TRAITS

OPENNESS

When someone is curious and open minded to new experiences and knowledge.People who are high in openness are inventive. They are curious, imaginative, and love to try new things. People who are low in openness are cautious, consistent and prefers routine. I’ll give you a few statements. Do you agree or disagree with these statements?

I love adventure.

I am imaginative.

I am the first to try new activities.

If you agreed, you are probably high in openness. If you disagreed, you are probably low in openness.

 

CONSCIENTIOUSNESS

Describes how organized and dependable you are. People who are high in conscientiousness are efficient, organized, systematic and punctual. People who are low in conscientiousness are more easy-going and laid back. They usually arrive late.

Do you agree or disagree with these statements?

I have high self-discipline.

I am very organized and always come prepared.

I like to know the plan rather than be spontaneous.

If you agreed, you are probably high in conscientiousness. If you disagreed, you are probably low in conscientiousness.

If you are leader and have a high score you want to make sure that people around you respect your desire to have a plan, but don’t get too frustrated with people who are low in conscientiousness. You can’t blame them for not being organized.

 

EXTROVERSION

Describes how you interact with people. People who are high in extroversion are outgoing and energetic. They are confident, active, cheerful, optimistic and sociable. They would rather be dead than alone. People who are low in extroversion are more solitary and reserved. They can manage to stand at a bar for 5 minutes without checking the phone.

Here are few statements. Do you agree or disagree with these statements??

I am the life of the party.

I don’t mind being the center of attention.

I am usually the one to start a conversation with someone.

If you agreed, you are probably high in extroversion. If you disagreed, you are probably low in extroversion.

There are some other ways to find out are you introvert or extrovert. Scientist can tell a lot about someone’s personality from their face. One fascinating study did a drawing of two typical faces. Just take the mirror and check if you are an Introvert or extrovert.

Low extroversion values are often interpreted as negative. Although, in fact, introvert is a person who is more independent than clingy, more balanced than insecure, more in peace with himself than concerned with getting approval from others. If you are low in extroversion be sure to not force yourself to try to be extroverted. Honor your introversion. There are the places and people who get you excited and stick to those nourishing spots. This helps you stay true to yourself–let the extroverts go to the nightclubs!

 

AGREEABLENESS

How do you feel towards others? People who are high in agreeableness seek harmony. They are friendly and compassionate. People who are low in agreeableness are more analytical and detached. They are initially skeptic toward others.

Do you agree or disagree with these statements?

I tend to trust people and give them the benefit of a doubt.

I am extremely empathetic.

I like to make other people feel at ease.

If you agreed, you are probably high in agreeableness. If you disagreed, you are probably low in agreeableness.

If you are low in agreeableness, empathy doesn’t come as naturally to you. So, your partner or working college might say things like, don’t you understand me? Or, why don’t you get me? That’s ok, know that you must make more of a mental effort to put yourself in their shoes.

 

NEUROTICISM

How you deal with emotions? People who are high in neuroticism are sensitive and tend to be more nervous. They are always worrying, unsure and tend toward unrealistic ideas. People who are low in neuroticism tend to be more secure and stable. Do you agree or disagree with these statements?

I stress out easily.

I tend to be moody.

I am a worrier.

If you agreed, you are probably high in neuroticism. If you disagreed, you are probably low in neuroticism.

If you are high in neuroticism you must know your triggers–what makes you worry? And your calmers–what helps you to calm down? So, you can be more in control of your moods.

 

 

SOURCES: 

  1. Sabina Morosini, Joyful Leadership Manual.
  2. Goldberg, L. R. (1990). An alternative “description of personality”: The
    Big-Five factor structure. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,
    59(6), 1216-1229.
  3. McCrae, R. R., Costa, P. T., Jr. (1999). A Five-Factor theory of
    1personality. In L. A. Pervin & O. P. John (Eds.), Handbook of
    personality: Theory and research (pp. 139-153). New York, NY, US:
    Guilford Press.
  4. McCrae, R. R., Costa, P. T., Jr. (2003). Personality in Adulthood.
    New York, NY, US: Guilford Press
  5. Hogan, R., Curphy, G. J., Hogan, J. (1994). What we know about
    leadership: Effectiveness and personality. American Psychologist, 49(6),
    493-504
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